The future belongs to nanotechnology © agsandrew / fotolia.com

The future belongs to nanotechnology © agsandrew / fotolia.com

PACKAGING IN THE NANO AGE

 SMALL PARTS - GREAT FUTURE.  The number of consumer products based on nanotechnology already exceeds 1,000 today. Over the next four or five years market researchers are forecasting a continuation of this global 21st-century trend, with a rising market volume and average annual growth rates of nearly 25 per cent. In packaging, in particular, experts are expecting to see an increase in the use of nano-optimised products, e.g. in antimicrobial pharmaceutical packaging, the recycling of packaging waste and the production of anodes for lithium batteries, using polystyrene packaging chips.
Nano particles, which are invisible to the naked eye, are now revolutionising the packaging market. © blicsejo, fotolia.com

Nano particles, which are invisible to the naked eye, are now revolutionising the packaging market. © blicsejo, fotolia.com

STRONG GROWTH EXPECTED IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL SECTOR

PACKAGING WITH SPECIAL PROTECTIVE FUNCTIONS . Over the coming years nearly a quarter of all packaging will apparently be made with the help of nano materials. According to the TMR analysts, there will be an increased use of antibacterial substances, particularly in the manufacturing of medical products. Moreover, due to demographic developments and an increase in age-related diseases, there is now a growing need for packaging with special protective functions – another area where nanotechnology offers decisive benefits. Even three years ago, in 2012, nearly half of the global demand for durable, hygienic packaging came from the pharmaceutical sector.
Use packaging chips for the production of valuable nano materials for lithium-ion batteries. © djama, fotolia.com

Most consumers have been putting packaging chips in their normal household waste. However, polystyrene takes about 100 years to decompose. US researchers have now found a way to use packaging chips for the production of valuable nano materials for lithium-ion batteries. © djama, fotolia.com

PACKAGING CHIPS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF NANO MATERIALS.

Packing flakes are particularly suitable for cushioning and securing items during shipment. US researchers have now found a way to use discarded packaging chips for the production of valuable nano materials for lithium-ion batteries. Production of the relevant nanoparticles requires less energy than conventional methods, and the batteries are also said to be more powerful than their conventional counterparts.

TIGHTLY PACKED

interpack Newsletter

  • Non-Food - packaging related topics from subject areas such as pharmaceutics, cosmetics, non-food and industrial goods.
  • Food - packaging related topics from subject areas such as food industry, beverages, bakery and confectionary.
Subscribe now!